More TED love– why science denial is dangerous

I know I’ve posted a lot of “look at this link” posts lately, but I couldn’t not share this.

Discussions about anti-vaccinators and other topics. I was partially on the anti-vaccination bandwagon, too. I’m not sure how I feel about some of the aspects of his points, but it’s definitely worth watching.

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3 Responses to More TED love– why science denial is dangerous

  1. Sungold says:

    Holy moley. I’m amazed that most people would choose to go back in time. The past is a scary place. I’m a historian. I’ve spent years studying the social history of medicine. I don’t want to go back into the era of TB and malnutrition, coverture and non-citizenship for women. The future is sure to hold horrors of its own, but I definitely wouldn’t want to go back!

    However: genetically modified food ≠ vaccinations, and I think he’s being a little bit intellectually disingenuous in lumping them together.

    He also leaves out the biggest counter-example of all for progress being automatically benign: the Holocaust, which relied centrally on modern technologies.

    Thanks for posting this, April.

    • Lyndsay says:

      True but most people seem to focus on the good stuff of the past and fear the future. I’m not sure why. Maybe it’s all those olden days movies where they show nothing of the daily difficulties of life. So it may not seem logical to want to go back but I’m not surprised.

    • April says:

      Thanks for checking it out! I don’t know if you’ve seen a lot of their talks, but there are so many good ones.

      However: genetically modified food ≠ vaccinations, and I think he’s being a little bit intellectually disingenuous in lumping them together.

      (how do you make that “does not equal sign? That’s great!)

      That bothered me, too. The whole “organic doesn’t really matter” just… really isn’t true, if you’re talking about real benefits to a human body. Obviously there are other factors to consider in regards to organic food and price and availability and accessibility, etc., but you can’t claim that there is no benefit. That’s just inaccurate.

      He also leaves out the biggest counter-example of all for progress being automatically benign: the Holocaust, which relied centrally on modern technologies.

      I’m admittedly a bit of a “technology evangelist” these days, but I will say that I think that as we get more sophisticated as a human race, we have already begun to collectively see something like the Holocaust as something to be avoided at all costs. I know there are still massive problems around the world, but I’m optimistic about the future.

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