Ali Carr-Chellman On Re-engaging Boys In Learning

I’ll admit at first I had a pretty evil thought about this video but after letting that pass I concluded that there is some good stuff going on here and a lot that I agree with. Damn shame it doesn’t get more attention.

So what do you think?

(Borrowed from Pelle Billing.)

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14 Responses to Ali Carr-Chellman On Re-engaging Boys In Learning

  1. zek j evets says:

    I’m curious as to what “evil” thought you had regarding this video?

    Personally, I felt it was brilliant. Sure, she missed a couple of other major points — like the lack of tolerance for masculine forms of friendship, bonding, learning styles, or that affirmative-action policies at the university level really only help White women, and leave Men of Color (along with People of Color in general) left out.

    But otherwise, I think she hit most of the major problems boys/men face in the school system, from kindergarten to university. And it’s about damn time too!

    However, I do take action with her saying that girls still need help in school. The statistics show that girls are not only doing better academically, they’re also making up the majority — in classrooms, in colleges, and in graduate programs. Girls/women are outpacing men in droves, which is an ironic reversal, but still very disturbing.

    I kind of wish she had talked more about misandry specifically. Because while she did mention “things in our culture”, she really seemed timid about taking that next step into specifying the misandry in our culture that is the cause of so many of the statistics and trends she talked about.

    (Funny example: “misogyny” doesn’t come up as a misspelled word in Firefox, but “misandry” does. Basically, “misandry” doesn’t exist as a word for Firefox. Or Microsoft Word. Or many other programs actually.)

    Anyhoo, I’m hopeful to see more focus on this issue, because it really does need to be addressed.

    • Schala says:

      Feminity also doesn’t exist.

      The dictionary proposes:
      Femininity (wtf is that?)
      Feminist
      Feminine
      Feminism

    • Schala says:

      Btw I’m using Canadian English dictionary. It also thinks misandry doesn’t exist.

      It gives this as alternatives to misandry:
      misanthropy
      Melisandra
      misanalysed
      misanthrope

      Transgender also doesn’t exist, alternatives:
      Trans gender
      Trans-gender
      Transponder
      Transcendent
      Transcendence

    • Schala says:

      Apparently people spell it often that way, but it’s not used this way at all in French (except as adopting the English word – you see, the only difference between the English and French word, is an accent on the e, and ending in é instead of y).

      Feminité
      Femininity

      Frankly, I’ll continue to say feminity. It’s not feminininininininism.

  2. ballgame says:

    I thought this talk was pretty good, by and large. I had a few quibbles — the salary comparison in the beginning was misleading, and I’m ambivalent about ‘boys will be boys’ undercurrent because I think there IS a problem with the broader culture expecting boys to be (capable of) violence which boys naturally internalize for a variety of reasons. But overall my impression of the talk was very favorable, and I think the speaker should be given plaudits for tackling the issue.

    What were the “evil thoughts” you referred to about your initial reaction?

  3. ballgame says:

    What an odd time for us to be cross-posting, zek j evets!

    😕

  4. Danny says:

    Okay folks the evil (which may be a bit strong of a word) thought I had was, “Well maybe since those uptight jerks that keep declaring that boys don’t need help when men talk about it will get their heads out of their asses and listen if a woman speaks up about it.”

    zek j evets:

    However, I do take action with her saying that girls still need help in school.

    I noticed that and the bullet point actually said that girls need more help in school. While I don’t like getting into “Olympic” type arguments I think with boys falling behind girls in nearly every demographic and nearly every measure its pretty clear who needs the help.

    I kind of wish she had talked more about misandry specifically. Because while she did mention “things in our culture”, she really seemed timid about taking that next step into specifying the misandry in our culture that is the cause of so many of the statistics and trends she talked about.

    I wish so as well but at least this opens the door to bringing up those specific things. I’ve grown very sick of people only wanting to bring up things like the “boys will be boys” when they are complaining about how good boys supposedly have it. If people really want to help boys get better (rather than using them for a whipping boy, see what I did there, that will never die) then let’s talk about everything rather than just cherry picking the things that make girls look like victims and boys look like perpetrators.

    (Funny example: “misogyny” doesn’t come up as a misspelled word in Firefox, but “misandry” does. Basically, “misandry” doesn’t exist as a word for Firefox. Or Microsoft Word. Or many other programs actually.)

    I know right. I think I even had to add it to the dictionary in Chrome on my pc as well. Unfortunately misandry doesn’t exist in the eyes of the computing world, the limited minds of feminists, and the world at large. If you can stand the vile hatred that stinks up the place take a look at this almost funny attempt at trying to prove that misandry doesn’t exist.

    • April says:

      Okay folks the evil (which may be a bit strong of a word) thought I had was, “Well maybe since those uptight jerks that keep declaring that boys don’t need help when men talk about it will get their heads out of their asses and listen if a woman speaks up about it.”

      I actually think it was good that a woman was up there talking about it. I mean, a man can, sure, but think of the stronger affect that a man talking about domestic violence, for example, can have. It seems that no one listens to anyone when they talk about problems that they, or their community, face. It seems that someone else speaking about can get a lot more attention and have a more positive impact.

      I really liked the talk. Like others have said, I hope they continue with it. Boys’ problems in school needs to be national discourse, not just a blurb here and there.

    • Danny says:

      True and that evil thought was brought on by a feeling of, “Really? We’ve been talking about this for a while and NOW you want to listen.” (and I would imagine that there times and issues where women, gays, and people of color feel the same way).

  5. Paul says:

    It’s a nice first step… now they need to take it further. Now that they’ve pointed out that these things happen… they need to examine *why* they happen.

    For example: Why aren’t more men becoming school teachers?

    1. Teachers don’t make a lot of money, and since men are (in many cases) still seen as “the provider” Most men are going to write teaching off.

    2. Men who want to work with kids (especially young kids) are suspect- even if that suspicion is only subconscious.

    When they start examining why these things happen, then maybe they can start coming up with results

    • Danny says:

      Those are two very good points Paul and it almost saddens me that a lot of people simply refuse to acknowledge them. Such people try to limit the reason for few male teachers to “men think its beneath them” which I think, while valid in some cases I bet, is nothing more than attempt at trying to make it the fault of men (similar to people that think the only reason men aren’t in children’s lives is because 100% of men in those situations just woke up one day and decided to run out on them).

      1. Teachers don’t make a lot of money, and since men are (in many cases) still seen as “the provider” Most men are going to write teaching off.
      Yes. Despite all this talk of how women don’t need men to provide for them there are still a lot of women still thinking in the old ways of men are supposed to provide for them. In cases like this men literally can’t afford to be teachers even if that is where their passion lies.

      2. Men who want to work with kids (especially young kids) are suspect- even if that suspicion is only subconscious.
      Another that is supposedly a figment of men’s imaginations or supposedly our own fault. Somehow despite only a small percentage of men being child molesters/abusers there is still this assumption that any man that enjoys being around kids must be in it to hurt them. But then people will act like that suspicion doesn’t exist and then throw their hands up wondering where all the men went. A few years ago there was this mentoring program running in my area and if I had been in a better position (my depression was just starting and no kid deserved to be around that and it was before I started blogging so my awareness wasn’t all that great either) I would have taken up the task. In fact I was asked more than once because I was told (almost direct quote), “The program is really hurting for men, especially black men.”

      The effects of men not being in kids lives, in education, and the effects of boys lagging behind in education are right in our faces. We will all be better off once the people with the loudest voices get their heads out of the asses and actually start paying attention to the whys and hows rather than parroting whatever excuse or lie will get them the most votes.

    • Darrell says:

      Excellent points being made here by all I feel. I think the presentation was excellent for the short time she had to present it.
      I raised four sons and one daughter, mostly alone. Boys were falling behind even in the latter seventies. Feminism was on the war path, and being male was a sin of sorts for alot of years. Things have changed in that equality became a reverse one as it does often. Look to TV commercials, men are presented as grown boys incapable of getting through the day without feminine guidance. TED itself has a separate website for womens issues. But the education evaluation was correct, but by the time it is remedied the women will have pulled too far ahead to catch up with. Women also have a unique ability to form groups to move themselves forward, and say what you will, men are still held to stereotypes of old.

    • April says:

      I’m happy to report that two guys I graduated went on to become elementary school teachers. It made me happy to learn that (on Facebook, of course).

  6. Darrell says:

    View Hanna Rosins TED talk ” New Data on the Rise of Women ” and I feel it adds great insight as to the attitudes men face now. For the sake of honesty, I commented on it as ” the worst lecture I have seen on TED ”

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